Remember | Resist | Redraw: A Radical History Poster Project by the Graphic History Collective.

Remember | Resist | Redraw: A Radical History Poster Project

Remember | Resist | Redraw logoIn 2017, the Graphic History Collective launched Remember | Resist | Redraw: A Radical History Poster Project, a collaborative project featuring works by artists and writers committed to promoting art, activism, and history in what is today known as Canada.

Remember | Resist | Redraw posters offer alternative perspectives on well-known historical events, and highlights histories of Indigenous peoples, women, workers, and the historically oppressed people that are often overlooked or marginalized in mainstream historical accounts.

We want to share these posters widely. The posters are available for free for personal, educational, and activist use. See how you can use the posters and support this project. If you are interested in exhibiting or publishing the posters, please read our guidelines and get in touch.

In order to change the world, we need to be able to imagine ways of living and organizing to bring about social change. We combine art and history because it helps us fuel our radical imaginations and dream of what might be. Activist art encourages us to remember, resist, and redraw our world with an eye to changing it for the better.

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  • 1793

    Chloe Cooley’s Resistance to Enslavement

    Chloe Cooley’s Resistance to Enslavement

    March 14, 1793
    Chloe Cooley
    Chloe Cooley’s resistance to re-enslavement in the States was so fierce that her captor needed the assistance of two other men to get her in a boat to cross the Niagara River in 1793. This wasn’t the only time she fought against her bondage before exiting Canada. Her defiance was the catalyst in eventually garnering […]
  • 1837

    The 1837–1838 Rebellion: Consolidating Settler Colonialism in Canada

    The 1837–1838 Rebellion: Consolidating Settler Colonialism in Canada

    October 23, 1837
    The 1837–1838 Rebellion: Consolidating Settler Colonialism in Canada
    In the 1830s the struggle to abolish irresponsible colonial rule in Upper and Lower Canada, and replace it with a form of government controlled by local settlers rather than by imperial rulers or their appointed representatives, involved significant debate, public protest, threats of violence, and outright rebellion. While the 1837-1838 Rebellion is often celebrated as […]
  • 1864

    The Tsilhqot’in War

    The Tsilhqot’in War

    October 15, 1864
    The Tsilhqot’in War
    In 1864, Tsilhqot’in warriors, led by Chief Klatsassin, waged war on invading colonists who brought death, disease, and dispossession to Tsilhqot’in territory. The Colony of British Columbia tricked the warriors into being captured by promising a peace parley only to arrest and eventually execute six of the warriors by hanging. Before he was executed Klatsassin […]
  • 1883

    John A. Macdonald: Father of Confederation, Architect of Genocide

    John A. Macdonald: Father of Confederation, Architect of Genocide

    May 9, 1883
    John A. Macdonald: Father of Confederation, Architect of Genocide
    John A. Macdonald (1815-1891) is often celebrated for his role as one of Canada’s “Fathers of Confederation.” What is lesser known, however, is that Macdonald, as prime minister, played a pivotal role in creating Canada’s destructive system of Indian Residential Schools that sought to “kill the Indian in the child.” Foundational to Macdonald’s agenda was […]
  • 1885

    Conservation is Colonialism

    Conservation is Colonialism

    January 1, 1885
    Conservation is Colonialism
    Beginning in the 1880s and intensifying in the early 1900s, the federal government created a national network of parks that conserved “natural” areas and commodified them to contribute to the capitalist economy and nation-building. As part of this process, many Indigenous communities were forcibly displaced within the newly-established park boundaries. Starting in 1885, my ancestors, […]
  • 1885

    When Canada Opened Fire on My Kokum Marianne With a Gatling Gun

    When Canada Opened Fire on My Kokum Marianne With a Gatling Gun

    May 9, 1885
    When Canada Opened Fire on My Kokum Marianne With a Gatling Gun
    Resenting the fact that their land was sold without consultation, the Métis took up arms against Canada in 1869, under the leadership of Louis Riel. The Métis Resistance was successful, and after a series of negotiations, the Métis entered Confederation with Canada with the 1870 Manitoba Act, which created the province of Manitoba. At Batoche, […]
  • 1900

    Caregiving Work in Canada 1900-2016

    Caregiving Work in Canada 1900-2016

    April 16, 1900
    Caregiving Work in Canada 1900-2016
    Canadian families have always relied on domestic workers. This was true before Confederation, when Canadian families used Indigenous and Black women as slaves. This was also true afterwards, when the Canadian government recruited women from overseas to work as domestic workers. Due to its “white settler” policy, the Canadian government recruited British and Western European […]
  • 1914

    Canada’s Internment of Ukrainians, 1914–1920

    Canada’s Internment of Ukrainians, 1914–1920

    August 22, 1914
    Canada’s Internment of Ukrainians, 1914–1920
    Between 1914 and 1920, the Canadian government used the War Measures Act to intern 8,579 people, including 4,000 Ukrainians, all recent migrants from the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Internees responded to the ill treatment and exploitation they experienced with insubordination and resistance. They engaged in sabotage, like work slowdowns, and, in some instances, rioted or struck for […]
  • 1919

    The Flu Pandemic: Health Inequity and Social Change

    The Flu Pandemic: Health Inequity and Social Change

    January 1, 1919
    1918-1919 Flu
    Although long referred to by historians as the “forgotten pandemic,” countless families and communities have memories of the 1918–1920 flu: stories of their people, how they persisted, and how their lives were changed by a disease outbreak that killed over 50,000 Canadians and at least 50 million globally. For much of the 20th century, history […]
  • 1919

    The Winnipeg General Strike

    The Winnipeg General Strike

    May 1, 1919
    The Winnipeg General Strike
    In May and June 1919, 35,000 workers in Winnipeg, Manitoba staged a six-week general strike. Workers from various backgrounds struck for higher wages and collective bargaining rights and to demand more power for working people. Ultimately, the strike was violently crushed by police acting on the orders of politicians and the city’s capitalists. Although the […]
  • 1922

    We are Inuit – Not Your Flag Poles

    We are Inuit – Not Your Flag Poles

    July 8, 1922
    This poster depicts writer Siku Allooloo’s family based on an archival photo taken in 1922. The family is depicted in white lines on a black background with different colours radiating from their heads. The background of the poster is red with the outline of some islands of the high arctic in pink and blue. Along the top it says, “We Are Inuit Not Artic Flag Poles,” and along the bottom it says: “Between the 1920s and 1960s, Canadian officials relocated Inuit families to the high arctic as a means to establish an RCMP presence and protect Canada’s sovereignty against foreign interests. Few Canadians know that Arctic Sovereignty was paid for by severe hardships suffered by Inuit, like Qattuuq and Ulaayuk’s family depicted here, whose resilience and fortitude has enabled their descendants to continue living as Inuit today.”
    Between the 1920s and 1960s, Canadian officials relocated Inuit families to the high arctic as a means to establish an RCMP presence and protect Canada’s sovereignty against foreign interests. Few Canadians know that Arctic Sovereignty was paid for by severe hardships suffered by Inuit, like Qattuuq and Ulaayuk’s family depicted here, whose resilience and fortitude […]
  • 1922

    Chinese students strike against segregated schools

    Chinese students strike against segregated schools

    September 5, 1922
    Chinese Student Strike
    In July 1922, the Victoria School District Board voted to exclusively segregate all racialized Chinese students. When the order came into effect on September 5th, Chinese students were called out of their classes and marched down the road. Upon reaching one of the newly-established Chinese-only schools an older boy gave a pre-arranged signal and students […]
  • 1925

    Cape Breton Coal Strikes

    Cape Breton Coal Strikes

    April 16, 1925
    An illustrated black and white poster consisting of a series of comics panels depicting coal miners’ struggles in 1920s Cape Breton.
    “They can’t stand the gaff!” The words failed to intimidate the coal miners. Instead, the insult contributed to their resistance, and “standing the gaff” became a rallying cry during the long 1925 strike. That strike was the culmination of the labour war in the Nova Scotia coal mines in the 1920s, an episode of class conflict […]
  • 1933

    Radical Bookshops in 1930s Montreal

    Radical Bookshops in 1930s Montreal

    January 1, 1933
    An illustrated poster with images of two radical bookstores and communists in 1930s Montreal
    The Modern Book Shop and the Hidden Book Shop were important spaces for radical education and organization in Montreal between 1933 and 1938. As such they were frequently targeted by fascists and the police for selling “seditious literature,” mostly from communist newspapers like Vie ouvrière, a communist monthly, The Daily Clarion from Toronto, and Clarté. Read More
  • 1939

    The Most Dangerous Woman in the World

    The Most Dangerous Woman in the World

    April 16, 1939
    The Most Dangerous Woman in the World
    Emma Goldman was born in 1869 to a Jewish family in Kaunas, Lithuania. Fleeing the pogroms of Europe, she immigrated to the United States in 1885 and committed herself to anarchism. She was deported in 1919 for her anti-war activities, and then after years of exile in Europe, Goldman came to Canada in 1939. She […]
  • 1942

    The Japanese Canadian Internment

    The Japanese Canadian Internment

    February 26, 1942
    The Japanese Canadian Internment
    In 1942, the federal government labeled 22,000 Japanese Canadians (over 75% were Canadian citizens) “enemy aliens.” In response to Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941, Canada declared war against Japan. Soon after, without any charge or due process, the government forcibly relocated Canadians of Japanese heritage living on the West Coast to internment camps […]
  • 1948

    Operation Profunc 1948-1983

    Operation Profunc 1948-1983

    January 22, 1948
    #32RRR-Operation-Profunc-web
    RCMP spying’s extent and secrecy was the thirty-five-year long covert program that began in 1948: Operation Profunc (PROminent FUNCtionaries of the Communist or Labor Progressive Party). This program planned to arrest Canadians in the event of a Communist-led attack or a leftist insurgence from within Canada’s own borders. Those arrested Canadians would be interned in […]
  • 1968

    1968-2017: Intergenerational Resistance in Vancouver’s Chinatown

    1968-2017: Intergenerational Resistance in Vancouver’s Chinatown

    February 7, 1968
    RRR#30-AnotherWorldisPossible
    In 1968, Bessie Lee, along with women and mothers of the community, co-founded the Strathcona Property Owner’s and Tenants Association (SPOTA) to stop “urban renewal” plans from the City of Vancouver, including the construction of a freeway that would demolish the neighbourhood. Through these efforts, they stopped the freeway from being built and spared neighbourhood […]
  • 1969

    The Sir George Williams Protest

    The Sir George Williams Protest

    January 29, 1969
    Sir George Williams Protest
    On 29 January 1969, roughly 200 students attending Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) in Montreal occupied the school’s computer lab to protest racist discrimination faced by six West Indian Students. The protest ended on 11 February when police forcibly removed and arrested 97 students. Before being arrested, students threw computer paper and punch cards […]
  • 1973

    We Still Think of the Yukon as Our Land

    We Still Think of the Yukon as Our Land

    March 13, 1973
    We Still Think of the Yukon as Our Land
    “We still think of the Yukon as our land,” wrote the Yukon Indian People in Together Today for Our Children Tomorrow, a document created by the Council of Yukon Indians (now, Council for Yukon First Nations) and submitted to Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1973. The document outlined a series of grievances that Indigenous […]
  • 1975

    Justice for Grassy Narrows

    Justice for Grassy Narrows

    August 1, 1975
    RRR#31-GrassyNarrows
    For the past 50 years, women, youth, and the community have led a movement to address the industrial mercury poisoning of their people, to protect their land, and assert their sovereignty. We remember those who are no longer here, those who are fighting today, and the future generations of resistance. Read More
  • 1977

    Pride Has Always Been Political: 1970s – 2016

    Pride Has Always Been Political: 1970s – 2016

    June 28, 1977
    Pride Has Always Been Political: 1970s – 2016
    Pride started off as the celebration of the rebellious origins of the queer and trans liberation movements in resistance to police repression in the later 1960s. In so-called Canada, Pride originated in the Montréal resistance to the Olympic police repression in 1976 and to the raid on the Truxx bar in 1977. It was these […]
  • 1983

    Kent Prisoner’s Hunger Strike

    Kent Prisoner’s Hunger Strike

    April 18, 1983
    Kent Prisoner’s Hunger Strike
    In late March, 1983, two Indigenous men began a hunger strike at Kent prison in Agassiz, BC protesting the prison’s unwillingness to provide access to spiritual practices. Prison officials refused to take action, by mid-April, eighteen other Indigenous prisoners joined the strike. On April 18, Sts’ailes Stó:lō woman Rose Charlie, president of the BC Indian […]
  • 1988

    Charles Roach: Warrior, Prince, and Servant of His People

    Charles Roach: Warrior, Prince, and Servant of His People

    January 11, 1988
    Image of Charles Roach with his fist raised and the words “Freedom of Conscience” written on his arm. Behind him is a silhouette of a person holding a hammer and the words “Don’t Take an Oath Lightly, You have to Believe in it."
    In 1988, the iconoclastic Charles Roach launched a battle against the Canadian government to remove the oath to the Queen as a condition of Canadian citizenship. In 1992, the Court of Appeal threw his case out, but in 2012 Roach, battling a life threatening illness, launched a similar suit: “I cannot see myself taking the […]
  • 1990

    The Seige of Kanehsatà:ke

    The Seige of Kanehsatà:ke

    July 11, 1990
    The Seige of Kanehsatà:ke
    In 1990, Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) of Kanehsatà:ke erected a barricade on a secondary road to prevent the Club de golf d’Oka’s plan to expand their 9-hole golf course and construct luxury condominiums on unceded territory, including a burial ground and pine forest. On 11 July, a para-military squad of the Sureté du Québec raided the peaceful […]
  • 1995

    Ts’Peten 1995

    Ts’Peten 1995

    July 15, 1995
    Ts’Peten 1995
    The siege of Ts’Peten (Gustafsen Lake) occurred in the south-central interior of “British Columbia” in the summer of 1995, after a white American ranger began harassing an Elder and his family at ta Secwepemc Sundance camp. Warriors responded to the Elder’s call for help, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) began a large paramilitary […]
  • 1995

    Calgary Laundry Workers Strike

    Calgary Laundry Workers Strike

    November 14, 1995
    Calgary Laundry Workers Strike
    In the early 1990s the Alberta Progressive Conservative government began a campaign of eliminated tens of thousands of public sector jobs and cutting wages. In 1995, when the Calgary Health Authority announced a contracting out of hospital laundry workers’ jobs, 60 laundry workers called in sick. Within ten days about 2,500 workers in six hospitals […]
  • 2009

    OCAP Confronts Austerity in Ontario

    OCAP Confronts Austerity in Ontario

    December 1, 2009
    We won't be quiet until we get the Special Diet.
    In 2009, 150 people, mostly Somali women, participated in an OCAP occupation of the Toronto Social Services offices. This was one of many direct actions during a successful campaign to increase access to the Special Diet benefit — an additional $250 for people living on social assistance. Read More  
  • 2012

    Idle No More Quebec

    Idle No More Quebec

    October 11, 2012
    Idle No More Quebec
    Melissa Mollen Dupuis is an Innu woman, mother, leader, cultural ambassador, and co-organizer of the Idle No More movement in the area known today as Quebec. Water protection is a sacred responsibility of all women. Being pregnant shows the continuity of the stewardship of this sacred river (Shipu — “river” in Innu) that connects us […]
  • 2012

    Idle No More: The Dance of Decolonial Love

    Idle No More: The Dance of Decolonial Love

    November 1, 2012
    Idle No More: The Dance of Decolonial Love
    When I am old, I will tell you I remember dancing. I will tell you I remember every time they said our starvation was natural and our dispossession was progress. When I am old, I will tell you I remember refusal. The dream of these twelve moons, just like the twelve thousand before and after, […]
  • 2018

    The Fight for Affordable Housing in Hamilton, Ontario

    The Fight for Affordable Housing in Hamilton, Ontario

    February 3, 2018
    Hamiliton Rent Strike
    In 2018, tenants in four high-rises in Hamilton, Ontario waged a seven-month rent strike fighting a landlord whose profit model involves displacing working-class people through gentrification. The strike did not prevent the landlord from imposing a steep rent increase. However, the collective power and sense of community the tenants forged through struggle created a strong […]
  • 2020

    Shut Down Canada

    Shut Down Canada

    February 8, 2020
    Shut Down Canada
    In February 2020, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Wet’suwet’en land defenders in so-called British Columbia. At the climax of the raid, heavily-armed police officers, accompanied by snipers and attack dogs, arrested unarmed Wet’suwet’en matriarchs on their unceded Yintah (land) in the middle of a ceremony. In response to this injustice, solidarity actions were taken […]

Posters

Poster #19: The Winnipeg General Strike

Poster #19: The Winnipeg General Strike

Poster #18: The Sir George Williams Protest

Poster #18: The Sir George Williams Protest

Poster #17: Canada’s Internment of Ukrainians, 1914–1920

Poster #17: Canada’s Internment of Ukrainians, 1914–1920

Poster #16: Radical Bookshops in 1930s Montréal

Poster #16: Radical Bookshops in 1930s Montréal

Poster #15: Cape Breton Coal Strikes, 1920s

Poster #15: Cape Breton Coal Strikes, 1920s

Poster #14: The Tsilhqot’in War of 1864

Poster #14: The Tsilhqot’in War of 1864

Poster #13: Charles Roach: Warrior, Prince, and Servant of His People

Poster #13: Charles Roach: Warrior, Prince, and Servant of His People

Poster #12: Rivers Within/Le fleuve sacré intérieur

Poster #12: Rivers Within/Le fleuve sacré intérieur

Poster #11: The Most Dangerous Woman in the World Lived in Canada

Poster #11: The Most Dangerous Woman in the World Lived in Canada

Poster #10: Remembering the 75th Anniversary of Japanese Canadian Internment

Poster #10: Remembering the 75th Anniversary of Japanese Canadian Internment

Poster #09: Ts’Peten 1995

Poster #09: Ts’Peten 1995

Poster #08: Batoche 1885: When Canada Opened Fire on My Kokum Marianne With a Gatling Gun

Poster #08: Batoche 1885: When Canada Opened Fire on My Kokum Marianne With a Gatling Gun

Poster #07: John A. MacDonald: Father of Confederation – Architect of Genocide

Poster #07: John A. MacDonald: Father of Confederation – Architect of Genocide

Poster #06: Pride has always been political

Poster #06: Pride has always been political

Poster #05: The Dance of Decolonial Love

Poster #05: The Dance of Decolonial Love

Poster #04: The 1837–1838 Rebellion

Poster #04: The 1837–1838 Rebellion

Poster #03: Caregiving Work in Canada

Poster #03: Caregiving Work in Canada

Poster #02: Chloe Cooley

Poster #02: Chloe Cooley